I’ve had the privilege of traveling to most every city in the United States and most every popular tourist destination. But while there may be less legwork involved, the Internet has created a new problem: With countless sites and online services out there, it’s hard to know which ones are actually worth your time — which may explain why the average traveler visits a whopping 39 websites before actually booking a trip.

There is much mindless mirth and musing online, but when it comes to taking actual travel decisions that will directly affect your wallet, wedding, wife, babes, boss and promotion prospects, the choice for feedback really falls into two broad categories – sites with professional reviews (think drab bespectacled editors and reporters trawling hotel rooms, beaches and business centres and reporting back to their readers, much like a CNET for laptops and cameras), or sites with user-generated reviews serving up feisty opinions in a no-holds-barred format.

Whenever I’m trying to figure out how to make my way between two destinations, I turn to Rome2rio I simply plug in my two points of interest—city, town, landmark or attraction—and Rome2rio will show me the different bus, train, ferry and flight options, along with how long these journeys will take.

Expedia has plenty of useful filters to help you find what you need; you can sort hotels by price, distance from downtown, guest rating, package discount, and property class, and flight options are given a rating reflecting the duration of the flight, the type of aircraft, and the quality of amenities the flight offers.” There’s also a map view so you can check out the location of each hotel.

By watching and analyzing ticket listings for billions of flights, Hopper will tell you when is the best time buy tickets for your flight, when an airline drops ticket prices, and even help you calculate the extra fees accumulating while you plan your next trip.